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chopinsky
07.11.02, 11:24 AM
hello..

I'm a classical pianist but I also play pop and church music by chords... kaya lng i always depend on scores... i always need pyesa when i play...

i'm just curious coz may gusto magpaturo sa akin ng piano but not through notes.. she wants "oido". can it be learned? or by listening practice lang?

I've been dreaming to learn how to play the piano or keyboard by "oido".. any tips on how to do it?

thanks! :)

titopao
07.11.02, 01:15 PM
Oido is a listening skill. This means that you can accurately listen to a given pitch or pitches and, if possible, translate it into singing or playing (on an instrument) exactly as you heard it. At it's very basic, you can also distinguish between a major and minor chord (and, if you're daring enough, you can also recognize diminished and augmented chords as well. I haven't even mentioned chords with the seventh!!!). You don't have to name them, just that you know how it sounds or "feel" when a chord is a major or minor chord.

That's just for starters: In a more extreme case, I would really demonize a person who wants to prove his/her oido skills by playing a pitch or a short collection of pitches and write it on a piece of blank music paper---in the exact space on the grand staff, no octave transpositions allowed :O If I'm sadistic, I'd ask the same person to transcribe a complete piece exactly as it was recorded, with absolutely no wrong note on the transcription and without the aid of an instrument :devil: I kid you not: if you're applying as a Composition major in the UP Conservatory of Music (that is, Prof. Ryan Cayabyab's major), they may ask you to do this (or something similar) during the second round of qualifying exams/auditions. So para dun sa mga nangangarap mag-apply as Composition majors sa UP College of Music.... :)

To improve your "oido" or listening skills, therefore, means that you should immerse yourself into music as much as you can :listening: As much as possible, I discourage listening to contemporary pop music as most music these days have limited range and variety in order to facilitate oido (so you can diss all your recordings of Beyonce, Parokya ni Edgar, Orange and Lemons....) Do not limit yourself to one genre only; try listening to as much music as you can, preferably not anything that you can hear on the radio. (If classical music is not your thing, there's no shame in trying out the Carpenters, Elvis Presley and Frank Sinatra, among others ::) )

Anyway, going back to topic, playing piano or any other instrument through oido would mean all of the following things:

1. Your listening skill is excellent (given above);
2. You are very familiar with the instrument yourself. You know how to produce the exact pitch you want on the said instrument;
3. You have the technical capability to do it on the instrument. In a more extreme case, you heard something over the radio and your fingers can play it exactly as it was played.

Hence, teaching someone to play an instrument by oido would first mean that this person is very much familiar with the instrument he/she wants to learn. This means that this person knows the difference between c, d, e...all the way to b, or the difference between middle C and any other Cs in the higher or lower octaves---and knows what he/she needs to do to reproduce that pitch (in the case of an 88-key piano, that would mean pressing the exact key).

Be that it may, not many people possess such an absolute skill on birth (some people get by through constant practice and listening). And more importantly, at one point in our lives, we all have to learn the basics of playing an instrument (for example, with the violin, you need to know how to tune the strings and how to properly hold the bow). I would suggest that for someone to learn playing through oido, he or she should be familiar with the mechanics of his/her instrument. You need to ask the following questions and anything similar to it:

* How are pitches produced on this instrument? By pressing keys on the finger? By pressing frets on one hand and strumming/plucking/bowing it on the other? By blowing on it and pressing keys at the same time? How long can you sustain pitches?

* What pitches are produced by pressing certain combinations (winds), keys (for keyboards, naturally) or frets?

* What pitches can and cannot be produced in this instrument? (For example, flutes can't play anything lower than the B below middle C---or, in case you have the recording of Hangad's Pananatili, it's the lowest note the flute plays in the introduction)

* For non-wind instruments, what combinations are possible? (For extreme instances, it's physically impossible to play a guitar chord with fingerings that are spread over seven frets, and it's also impossible for both your hands to play chords that are spread over two octaves...unless your name is Sigismond Thalberg, Frederic-Francois Chopin, Franz Liszt, Leopold Godowsky or Sergey Rachmaninov, among others ;) ).

In other words, in order to learn how to play an instrument through oido, you should be able to recognize what you hear exactly as it is, and you should know how to do it on the instrument you prefer. You can strive to do the first objective without an instrument, and in the second objective you should know your instrument well, to the point of being overly familiar with it.

Be aware that, unless you are a full-time musician, you can't learn it overnight. You'll need to dedicate a certain amount of time in learning your instrument and your piece---whether through sight-reading or through oido---and if you're just starting out, the learning curve is a bit steep as your ears may not yet be familiar with absolute pitches. Having said this, I still strongly recommend learning how to read and write---and, if possible, memorize---written music. If you're trying to learn a new piece, there's still an advantage in learning it from the sheet music over learning it by ear (and if you're really, really good, you can "hear" the music while reading it without ever having to use an instrument or even hum it :) ). Besides, you have the advantage of learning a virtually unlimited number of pieces if you know how to read well. So essentially, learn oido if you must, but don't forget to read music ;)

Note that at this point, I haven't fully answered the question "Can oido be learned?" That's because even scientists are bitterly divided over the right answer. Current scientific evidence suggests that the answer says it can either be inherited/innate or acquired, but no definitive answer exists. So at this point, all I can say is: if it's something natural to you, congrats! If you don't have it, you can still learn it with patience, don't lose hope. But if you think you truly belong to the "hopeless"...well, good luck to you (aminin natin sa hindi, meron talagang mga taong mahirap turuan kahit na ilang taon mong tutukan); my best advice is to start immersing yourself into music as early as possible and as much as you can. There are no shortcuts. :8

Full disclosure: I never had any formal lessons in music (not even a Grade 1 piano lesson). All I learned about music (including sight-reading, playing instruments and even writing music) is purely self-learned. I rarely use sheet music when playing on masses :D

olisaludo
07.11.02, 04:07 PM
i think they call it :"ear training".... in short, it can be learned (though some are born to have keen ears for music).. look it up on google. there are even
"ear training software" to facilitate your learning of oido (i once used an ear training software, btw)... ciao!

chopinsky
07.11.02, 06:31 PM
thanks titopao & olisaludo for that quick response!!! :)

I don't know if you'll agree with me, but I think there are rare classical pianists like me who could do "oido". We always depend on notes.

I'm not bragging but I'm a perfect pitch person. There's no problem with me identifying and notating the pitch I hear from the piano any octave it may be. I remember doing it when I had Theory 3 & 4 class under Prof. Ryan Cayabyab at the UP College of Music back in 1992 (I was a BM student major in Piano in UP). He asked all of us in the class to notate the song of Lea Salonga (can't remember the title) and it was just easy to do it. But hearing a song and playing it at once on the piano is so difficult for me. And that's the skill I want to develop.

I really admire those people who could do it. Name any tune, they could play it at once. Just like the pianists in the hotel lounge wherein you could request any song and they could easily play it.:(

titopao
07.11.02, 07:34 PM
chopinsky,

(btw, I looooove Chopin :) )

Actually...I did try auditioning for Composition. Back then, we were asked to transcribe a two-measure piece in the exact pitch and note duration (as a bonus, the auditioner gave us the time signature, though he didn't tap the beat). Hindi po sa pagmamayabang, but AFAIK the furthest the others have gone was half of the second measure (someone transcribed the pitches correctly but not the duration) even though the same two-measure phrase was played ad nauseam, while I got it after just ten minutes :) For some reason, though I didn't pursue my application, though I'm still entertaining thoughts of doing music full-time someday.

Years before that, I was asking my aunt to buy me the sheet music of Jim Chappell's "Gone", but she had a hard time looking for it in the States. What I did instead was buy the tape (after much searching), then listened to it over and over. First I tried to analyze the structure of the piece, then I tried writing it measure by measure. I completed my transcription after less than two hours. Months later, I was able to buy a sheet music of "Gone" (not the inferior transcription by Priscilla Halili), and I was surprised to discover that out of around 60-70 measures, I only mistranscribed less than five notes! It was the first time I tried transcribing anything, and I was happy to find out that I did a good job on that one. That was over ten years ago, when I was struggling to learn everything I can about music on my own.

This is why, I believe, "oido" can be "learned"---but only if people are willing to spend time and energy to sharpen their listening skills. It worked for me, so I guess it could also work with others, though I'm giving leeway for each person's learning curve (i.e. some people may be able to learn it quickly while others may take some time). However, I bwith I could easily teach it to others: Because I never had formal music lessons, much more took up Music Pedagogy (or whatever it's called in other conservatories), I personally find it very difficult to teach anything related to music :( If there was a way for me to do this as easily as possible, I would surely post it as best as I can :)

* * *

olisaludo,

Ear training software can help you recognize pitches and some basic melodic sequences and chord sequences, but it can only take you so far. Personally, I don't want other people to rely on it. I'd prefer that besides using ear training software and other similar tools, people should spend more time listening and (if possible) reading music.

I use the following analogy: when children learn to read, they first start with letters (how many of us remember using "flash cards" way, way back? ;) ), then with a few basic words, then with a few basic sentences, then with a few simple stories. Then as they grow up, they should begin reading more "advanced" or more complex reading materials appropriate for their age.

For me, ear training could give you the basics (the "letters" and the "basic words"), but you can't depend on it in the long run as it can only provide just that: the basics. Once you've outgrown your ear training software, the time should come when you should begin taking yourlearning further; the whole of music (of which ear training belongs to) is much, much complex, a universe to itself that it even has its own language, vocabulary, grammar and semantics.

chopinsky
07.11.02, 08:03 PM
wow titopao!!! :wow:

that's a great talent you have... you could make big money for transcribing songs. please let me know if you are in to that kind of business.. I might be one of your future clients. hehehehe.... :yes:

i think you are musically talented and if i were you, take few units in the conservatory either UP or UST.. (i'll recommend UST of course.. ;D). you could be one of the greatest musicians or composer of our country.. :)

going back to "OIDO", i will try to find time to practice it... i'm determined to learn how to do it... :)

Hot_keys
07.11.03, 02:01 AM
Gud day po!

Just want to share my experience regarding sa topic nyong oido. I've been playing keys for almost 10 to 12 years. Naging teacher na rin po ako before sa yamaha school of music. Oido can be learn....as what they've said. But there's a person na gifted in terms of doing it. Mas madali para sa akin ang oido than reading scores na minsan ay may typographical error pa at mali-maling akorde,pitch at nota. Minsan nag-iisip ako na "di kaya ayaw lang nila ipatugtog mga music nila? kaya kunwari may mga errors?" Hehehe. Just kiddin'....:) Would you believe na accident lang po ang pagiging musikero ko? There's a church song na gustong gustong kong matutunan. When i try to play the notes on keys,(without score) di po ako nahirapan. Then i study the chords, etc. before ako nag self-study how to read notes and right finger positions & use atbp.
I play in a variety band, minsan sa hotel, most of the time sa mga functions or special occasions. Mp3 lang po ang materials namin (not music score) to get all the sounds,groove,chords, etc. Imagine playing Earth,Wind & Fire "September (live)". Me, as a keyboardist, will get all sounds like brass,strings,piano habang nagbaback-up vocals na sinkupado ang tipa sa bawat tunog. And I'm very thankful kasi nabiyayaan ako ng konting tenga...or oido.

Eto po tip: Just try it on easy & slow songs na key of "CM7" muna for beginners. Look for a song na paulit-ulit lang ang melody line and chords.

Then....practice,practice,prctice. :)

reagan
07.11.03, 02:02 PM
Yup... it can be learned...

Dati, when bago pa lang ako nagtutugtog nga gitara (hindi ako masyadong marunong ng keyboards.. hehe...), lagi ako nakadepend sa chords, yung para bang song hits. hehe. later on, through constant practice, you learn to feel the sound of the chords, and gradually you become a "oidoer" (for lack of a better term... hehe...)

Minsan, as practice, i listen to an FM station, and try to play along with the songs played on the radio. It also helps to take note of chord patterns like (C-Am-Dm-F-G) and the likes. :)

btw, meron kaming bagong member sa choir na accompanist din. Una siyang natutong mag gitara. Tapos nag-aral siyang mag-keyboards, without the benefit of a chord chart or formal training. Ang ginawa niya, mina-match niya ang tunog ng mga strings sa guitar sa mga keys sa keyboards. Tapos ayun... not surprisingly, ang galing niyang mag oido... hehe..

yun lang po.... :)

chopinsky
07.11.03, 03:29 PM
hello hot_keys,

may recommend ka ba song na pwede for oido beginners like me? :)

hello hot_keys & reagan,

i think it's really a God-given talent to play by "oido".. I may say if hindi ako nagstart ng formal lessons sa piano, i may have also developed the "oido" skill. ang hirap kasi ibreak ung nakasanayan na, ung pag read ng notes. pag nasanay na sa notes, ang hirap mag switch sa "oido". pero i know some pianists who could do both - notes and oido. grabe! ang galing talaga nila tumugtog.

how i wish i have that talent too... :(

titopao
07.11.04, 09:37 PM
There's also one thing that I missed out, and this is also critical in developing "oido" (how could I have missed out on this?!?!?! :( )

Improvisation :)

Improvisation is a skill that can help develop oido. It can be learned (and in some music schools with a modern/pop orientation [most notably at the Berklee College of Music, Gerard Salonga and Louie Ocampo's alma mater], it's even a core subject). There are also some good books about improvisation (and most of these, unfortunately, are US-published). Basically, you'll need to be familiar with scales/arpeggi (the complete major and minor scales in all 24 keys [huwag kayong matakot sa key signature na may apat o higit pang accidentals! ;) ] and most modern scales/arpeggi such as jazz, bebop, blues and gospel scales/arpeggi) and then figure out how you can invent arrangements and fill-ins on that given style. I also suggest familiarizing yourself with the basic rhythms associated with each style (e.g. "comping" [accompanying] in jazz has a certain feel to it that's very different from, say, gospel music or a simple ballad).

Ito nga pala ang isang reason why I always suggest listening to as many musical styles as possible (and, may I add, with as many composers, orchestrators and arrangers are possible, so start reading up on the credits of every song you listen as well). Only by becoming very, very familiar with a particular style can you absorb the esssence of that style. If your portable keyboard has a rhythm section (most of them do anyway), you can also start playing around and listen to each style/rhythm (get your manuals in case you need to :) )

For starters, pianists can try listening to lounge piano music (although may pagka-flashy or pagka-show off ang lounge piano music) as most lounge pianists imnprovise on the spot. (Steer clear of piano background music that you hear on many locally-produced movies TV shows, they tend to sound boring and syrupy :devil: )

herald
07.11.05, 10:46 AM
wow!!, titopao, galing... sobra ang hanga ko sa mga may ganitong skills, We have a member na, pati base and 7th nakukuha nya.. as in kasabay ng song sinusulat nya, sigh.. mahaba pa pala ang lalakbayin ko... pero I'm learning it... thanks for the tips...

titopao
07.11.05, 09:28 PM
We have a member na, pati base and 7th nakukuha nya.. as in kasabay ng song sinusulat nya

Your friend must have been born with a radio in hand LOL

That's why I also suggest playing around with chords (major and minor, and if you're daring enough, diminished and augmented chords, as well as the variations of these four with the seventh [and maybe with sixths and ninths/seconds]) and discovering how they sound, whether it's played as block chords, arpeggiated or distributed across your hands. (Besides, if you're improvising on the spot, this knowledge will improve your playing ;) )

Each scale, chord and arpeggio has its own "flavor" or "color". Our tongues know how sweet, sour, salty and bitter tastes, but at one point in our lives we have to learn the names of each flavor; the most advanced food-tasters among us can distinguish combinations of flavors and describe them as best as possible. Using the analogy of sight, we can easily tell colors apart, but we have to learn their names at one point and, after much practice (when we were younger), determine which object is, say, redder than the others.

In the same manner, By learning scales, chords and arpeggios and connecting them with their "letter names" or position on the grand scale can we help develop our listening skills. This is why (as chopinsky, allen lucas and prof. simba can tell you) serious musicians do their scales and arpeggio exercises as much as they can, whether they be pianists, violinists, flutists or singers (or whatever). And this, by the way, is also why your choir should include vocalises in their practices: it helps make both the singers and choirmasters sensitive to their own sound. (Of course, your singers' vocal cords will also be trained to produce a particular pitch if done right; after all, practice makes perfect :) )

Listening to various kinds of music, on the other hand, will allow us to apply what we know so far. Doing scales and arpeggios are good in building up your listening skills, but if it's the only thing you do, it will bore you to death and might actually be detrimental, so start exploring your CD/MP3 collection as well as those of your friends' (with their permission, of course ;) )

If you want to take this further, you can also apply these knowledge in discovering the particular style of a musician or a group of musicians. For example, Ryan Cayabyab uses a particular pattern near the end of his choruses/refrains using the same bass line. Once you've listened to more of their music, you can tell Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin and Liszt apart even if you've heard a couple of measures. BP's Norman Agatep uses a particular style for blending the choruses/refrains. Hangad's Paulo K. Tirol uses a particular sequence (usually, on a song's bridge or refrain) that you can be certain most of his arrangements have it (I found it on his latest arrangement [for "I Will Sing Forever"], too). For obvious reasons, I won't tell you what I found out about these musicians: consider it as homework LOL

musiktenor
07.11.24, 10:36 AM
basta keep on playing. you'll laern how to play improvisation "oido". practice lang. discover chord progressions and chord inversions. you'll see your playing will flourish from simple to pro sounding accompaniment

nasserpellas
08.02.06, 11:16 PM
Me i was high school di ko alam na OIDO ang tawag dun

lordz
08.02.24, 09:28 AM
oido pala spelling nun. hehe
i dont know how to read notes and i play guitar and piano using chords only. sana pinagpatuloy ko formal lessons ko para i could learn more songs thru sheet.

brochelito
08.03.29, 04:32 PM
thanks TITOPAO you‘r the best

blastedcleric
08.04.04, 12:37 PM
Sa palagay ko po, ang key lang diyan is familiarization. Kasi, I can only OIDO in singing. When I hear a song, I can easily "replicate" it by singing, though, only in pitch, tone, etc.

jonjefff
08.04.14, 01:53 PM
Its true familiarization thru ear ang tawag sa "OIDO". My wife plays the piano/organ using note sheets, i can play but I can oido lang, my observation is sanayan lang talaga, kung sanay ka sa sheets, yun ang gawin. Pero kaso nga laging walang score sheets available sometimes kaya kelangan i-oido. Practice lang talaga. Now that I have very rare time playing piano, medyo rusty na rin ang pag-oi-oido ko, hopefully mag-ka-time ulit. Lalo na ngayon, may mga computers na na pwedeng mag-play ng MIDI files thru Finale, Sibelius or Noteworthy.

ernanibaetiong
08.04.14, 09:48 PM
yup, yun na po siguro yung nearest term, familiarization by ear.

nadedevelop po yan and in rare and very blessed instances eh as a gift to some.

ingat lang po sa mga meron nang ganitong talent, may times na we have to digitally transpose while playing (esp when you are playing for old singers who cannot reach standard keys). lakas po makasira nito sa talent na yan, been there and up to now still just recovering from it, kaya now i refuse to play for people who need transpositions

smeagol05
08.06.21, 11:37 PM
yun pala tawag dun.. ^__^

tmlagamon
08.07.20, 07:53 PM
hmmmmm. research nga ako kung pano maging oido....... hehehe.

amarante_edsel
08.07.20, 10:27 PM
I think isa po ito sa pinakamahirap na matutunan, dahil kelangan talaga may tenga ka sa pakikinig and dapat may patience to properly replicate the song in your head.

Still...kung nakaya ng iba, posible...

allen lucas
08.07.20, 11:36 PM
isang way para matutunan natin ang "OIDO" ay dapat alam nating yung family chords or kung anong mga chords ang naka major or minor sa isang certain key in this way madali nating mapapraktis ang oido natin kase alam natin kung san pupunta yung kanta. actually ako kahit music ang course ko medyo hirap ako sa oido, masyado kase akong nakadepende sa music sheet isa ito siguro sa weakness namen na mga music majors.

angelo_a
09.02.16, 06:02 AM
Does OIDO stand for anything? If not mistaken "oido" means ear in Spanish. And if you translate "to play by ear" in Spanish, it will be "tocar de oido". I'm just wondering why oido is spelled in all caps.

isang way para matutunan natin ang "OIDO" ay dapat alam nating yung family chords or kung anong mga chords ang naka major or minor sa isang certain key in this way madali nating mapapraktis ang oido natin kase alam natin kung san pupunta yung kanta. actually ako kahit music ang course ko medyo hirap ako sa oido, masyado kase akong nakadepende sa music sheet isa ito siguro sa weakness namen na mga music majors.

titopao
09.02.16, 08:19 AM
The Spanish word for "ear" is also spelled "oido" :)

So when you say someone has an "oido", you're essentially saying that someone has "an ear [for music]".

Nothing fancy about it, really. Parang idiom lang sa Spanish na nagkataong pareho din sa idiom sa English. Yung Tagalog counterpart na "may tenga sa music" or "tinetenga sa music" isn't native to Tagalog, literal translation lang 'yun ng Spanish/English idioms :P

LMacaranas
09.02.16, 08:39 AM
Antagal ka ng musikero, pero ngayon ko lang narinig (o nabasa) ang term na to.....hmmm...."sipra" na lang o "tenga", ok na yun.

jocheben
09.02.16, 08:47 AM
wrong spelling pala ako, akala ko wido.ito pala ang tama 'oido'..

yenzephyr
09.02.16, 10:21 AM
nakakatuwa naman ang thread na ito. buti na lang nabasa ko sya.I don't know if you'll agree with me, but I think there are rare classical pianists like me who could do "oido". We always depend on notes.......But hearing a song and playing it at once on the piano is so difficult for me. And that's the skill I want to develop.I really admire those people who could do it. Name any tune, they could play it at once. Just like the pianists in the hotel lounge wherein you could request any song and they could easily play it.:(

amen to that, chopinsky. there are times nga na naglolokohan kami ng mga friends ko. sinisisi namin yung classical music teachers namin na hindi kami tinuruan mag oido kaya masyado kami dependent sa piyesa.

This is why, I believe, "oido" can be "learned"---but only if people are willing to spend time and energy to sharpen their listening skills. It worked for me, so I guess it could also work with others, though I'm giving leeway for each person's learning curve (i.e. some people may be able to learn it quickly while others may take some time).

@ titopao, salamat naman sa insight mo. nagpapaturo ako ngayon mag oido. kulang na lang sakin is yung time. kase hindi pa maganda outcome ng gawa ko hahaha...

Oido can be learn....as what they've said. But there's a person na gifted in terms of doing it. And I'm very thankful kasi nabiyayaan ako ng konting tenga...or oido.

Eto po tip: Just try it on easy & slow songs na key of "CM7" muna for beginners. Look for a song na paulit-ulit lang ang melody line and chords.

Then....practice,practice,prctice. :)

buti ka pa, gifted... well, i hope i'm on my way to learning oido.

johnako
09.02.17, 05:41 PM
sobrang nakakainspire naman 'tong thread. gusto kong magkaroon ng oido!

-kowtow- for titopao. sir, I agree with what chopinsky said, baka isa ka sa mga great unknown musicians in the country. keep it up sir and thank you for helping us newbies. :)

flyingmonk
09.02.17, 07:01 PM
The Next Mozart?

Emily Bear, 6-Year old piano prodigy, Composer. Born to play the piano. At age 3 discovered by her grandmother playing C scale with her 3 fingers. Her music "comes from her heart"

I just want to share this video... :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUx4t4W4eVY

nlim
09.02.17, 09:14 PM
Gusto mong ma hasa ang oido mo, malapit na ang mahal na araw. Sakripisyo na matututo ka pa at mapapraktis pa ang tainga mo sa iba-ibang pattern ng chords.
To those of you na naguumpisa pa lang sa gitara, playing for the pasyon is a good training ground. Ginawa ko na ito at it really is worth it.:)

Berry
09.07.08, 10:50 AM
Antagal ka ng musikero, pero ngayon ko lang narinig (o nabasa) ang term na to.....hmmm...."sipra" na lang o "tenga", ok na yun.

ang pagkakaalam ko, sipra kase ang pagkapa sa gitara. tapos dati akala ko, "widow" ang spelling ng oido.

nagulat ako nung sunday kase kahit papaano, marunong pala akong mag-oido. konting-konti lang. nakapa ko kase sa piano yung isang kanta na hindi ko alam tugtugin kase wala akong piyesa. ang saya naman. i just have to practice.

allen lucas
09.07.08, 11:06 AM
Ako din hirap ako sa oido, pero paunti unti natutunan ko ito, dapat lang kase alam mo yng family chords ng Key na nakuha mo para from there alam mo kung yung key na yun eh Major o minor chords, minsan kased pakiramdaman din ang kailangan para masipra mo ang isang kanta. isang tip pag nakarinig ka ng isang kanta ang unang mong hanapin ang yung Bass part niya pag nakita mo na ito at alam mo na yung key niya malalaman mo na kung yung bass part na nasipra mo ay Major key o kaya minor key.

prinze
09.07.08, 03:34 PM
Antagal ka ng musikero, pero ngayon ko lang narinig (o nabasa) ang term na to.....hmmm...."sipra" na lang o "tenga", ok na yun.

Parehas tayo LM. hahahaha. madalas ngang sabihin eh, "Sige, sisiprahin ko na lang," "Sige, tetengahan ko na lang."

Madali lang ito. (wido din ang pagkakaalam ko before.) Ang ginagawa kong practice dito. Nakikinig ako sa radio. At bawat kanta na i play nung DJ, sisabayan ko ng piano. Practice lang ang kailangan.

Alexander
09.07.09, 07:19 AM
Nung wala pa rin akong ibang resource kundi mag record ng kanta sa Sunday TV mass nung panahon ng Canticle Choir sa TV ke Bro Frank Jimenez (clue... di pa nagsisimula ang Bukas Palad noon)...
Tinetenga ko rin lang ang kanta nila noon and I am proud to say after notating it (tuldok system lang at walang time signature or note length) we sounded very close lalo na sa The Lords Prayer by Malotte at Panis Angelicus.

nlim
09.07.09, 05:16 PM
you can learn faster with notation or sa solfegio kung may ouido ka. Ouido lang din ako noong araw until nagaral lang ako ng notes:)

maj
09.07.10, 01:29 AM
i remember very well when i was young, i used to play tunes on ny small keyboard by ear...my parents recognized the talent and without second thought, enrolled me to a formal piano lesson with the holy spirit sisters..modesty aside, i learned my piano pieces at a good pace...however, we were not allowed to play any other piece except for our own and if ever heard, our co-piano students would list our names and so we were fined.(50cents that time)..that was the end of my playing by the ear (oido)..i managed to render a premiere piano recital but never daveloped an ear that explores...now, at this age, i am at the same shoe with chopinsky...and i really feel so bad about it...(tho i imagine chopinsky being good at it by now, having studied the craft earlier than me)...i'm struggling and still wont give up because i feel tired already of carrying bulks of pieces just to be able to play at mass..i hope more people post tips here...i'm really very eager to learn oido... kung meron pong magtiyatiyagang magturo sa akin na taga-manila, just let me know...luluwas talaga ako...:)

d0d0fer
09.07.10, 03:52 PM
ang pagkakaalam ko, sipra kase ang pagkapa sa gitara. tapos dati akala ko, "widow" ang spelling ng oido.

nagulat ako nung sunday kase kahit papaano, marunong pala akong mag-oido. konting-konti lang. nakapa ko kase sa piano yung isang kanta na hindi ko alam tugtugin kase wala akong piyesa. ang saya naman. i just have to practice.

"Cifra" is an Italian word. Please note the correct Italian spelling. The direct English translation is "to cipher". It applies not only to any musical instrument but also when figuring out the lyrics of a song you are trying to learn. My oido skill is self-learned and I am very good at playing by ear, better than my sight-reading skill. :)

titopao
09.07.10, 04:31 PM
"Cifra" is an Italian word.

It's also a Spanish word and has the same spelling and meaning. Shouldn't be a surprise because Spanish and Italian have a good number of cognates with the same meanings (after all, both languages were descended from Latin) :)

d0d0fer
09.07.10, 07:28 PM
It's also a Spanish word and has the same spelling and meaning. Shouldn't be a surprise because Spanish and Italian have a good number of cognates with the same meanings (after all, both languages were descended from Latin) :)

Thanks for the additional info. :)

Local cover bands have slang terms related to "cifra" but not exactly the same meaning.

Alyas - to play the music almost similar to the original but not exact cover and not improvised.

Zapote - to play an obviously bad cover of the music.

Other musical terms used by local original and cover music bands:

Tunog Balbon - terrible sound or music performance

Labemol - excellent sightreader

Primera Vista - first sight musician

Nombra/Nombre - to be recommended for session music work or project

Saytay - practice or rehearsal

:)

red100K
09.11.08, 10:44 AM
for choir purposes, it's best if we know note reading and oido. makes learning a new song a lot faster :)

Bien
09.11.09, 06:36 PM
Iyong sagot sa tanong...YES! natututunan naman yan as long na musician (instrumentalist/vocalist) ka :)

Sa pagkakasabi or alam ko na si Gary V. hindi sight reader, oido lang sya? tama ba?

yenzephyr
10.04.26, 10:06 AM
may mga natutunan ako yesterday about oido.

before kasi pag nangapa ako ng song, kung anong gusto kong key, dun ko siya kinukuha. usually, sa C, D, G or F lang.

what i learned yesterday:

1. dapat pala, meron kang song hits or chords man lang nung song para alam mo kung anong itatakbo nung kanta. at dapat, hanap ka rin ng iba pang chords kasi baka may iba pang ginawa na mas tama compared dun sa meron ka na;

2. dapat rin, alam mo yung song. :) guilty. kasi may ginawa ako pero chorus lang ang alam ko. pinagawa ko kay bien yung verse. ang nangyari, iba yung hawak niyang chords (downloaded) sa hawak kong chords (galing sa songhits). so from verse going to chorus, hindi na magkatugma. although parehong key of A yung hawak namin, magkaiba pala yung ibang chords. merong minor sa songhits, major yung sa internet;

and

3. since gagawaan ko ito ng piyesa, kailangan na rin ng mp3 of the song para alam ko putulin in bars yung melody.

yun lang.

nakakatuwa rin. pero mas madaling i-oido pa rin para sakin yung madadali lang ang takbo ng chords. :)

d0d0fer
10.04.26, 10:23 AM
2. dapat rin, alam mo yung song. :) guilty. kasi may ginawa ako pero chorus lang ang alam ko. pinagawa ko kay bien yung verse. ang nangyari, iba yung hawak niyang chords (downloaded) sa hawak kong chords (galing sa songhits). so from verse going to chorus, hindi na magkatugma. although parehong key of A yung hawak namin, magkaiba pala yung ibang chords. merong minor sa songhits, major yung sa internet;

Anong song ba ito? Hanapin ko nga ang music sa YouTube at subukan ko rin kapain ang chords.

yenzephyr
10.04.26, 10:29 AM
haha, tapos na po, sir. yung "i will (take you forever)" ni christopher cross. :)

reginacaelichoir
10.11.19, 02:09 PM
I first studied a little bit of notes then how to play a song or accompany a song the I want it. Tapos doon ko lang na-realize na 'yun pala ang oido. Then later I decided to study more on notes.

vic_romero
10.11.23, 08:53 AM
Ang salitang "oido," tulad ng ibang salita, ay hindi na iisa ang kahulugan. Tulad ito ng "mabait." Mabait ka ba: 1) kung minsan, 2) madalas, o 3) hindi, kahit kailan?

May oidong hindi marunong magbasa ng nota. May oidong hindi man alam ang mga pangalan ng mga chord. Ganito ang kaibigan kong si Luke na taga-Porac, Pampanga. Napakagaling sa gitara. Hindi man niya alam ang ibig sabihin ng: C, Am, Dm, G7. Hindi niya alam ang ibig sabihin ng: do, si, la, sol, fa, mi, re do. Pero ang galing niyang maggitara. Puro lang tainga at utak ang ginagamit. Ito ang katutubong kahulugan ng salitang oido.

Ang karamihan sa atin ay nakakabasa ng nota o alam ang mga chord. Masasabing tayo ay "nakakatugtog nang oido lamang." Sa totoo, tayo ay hybrid na oido at mambabasa ng nota.

At ang huling kaso ay ang mga taong marunong tumugtog, kung may nota; pero hindi makakatugtog kung walang nota. Ang mga ito ay tiyak na hindi marunong ng oido.

mike kiddie
11.03.28, 11:17 PM
ako po ay dating oido nung bata. tenga-tenga at kapaan lang gamit para makatugtog. pero habang lumalaki at nawala ang time sa pagtugtog, nawala ito. pero nung nag-self-study na ako na magbasa ng nota. di na ako makatugtog ng walang binabasa. :)

boybskie
11.11.26, 08:46 AM
Does OIDO stand for anything? If not mistaken "oido" means ear in Spanish. And if you translate "to play by ear" in Spanish, it will be "tocar de oido". I'm just wondering why oido is spelled in all caps.

tnx sa infos sir...bravo!!!:whistle: